Gesture-based Interactive Storefront Advertising

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Overview


"There's never been a better time to be in this business—over the last 2 years we have made great strides. Digital placed-based media is currently the fastest growing sector of today's media economy with 25% year-over-year growth. We have reached more than $1 billion in advertising revenue. It took the cable industry almost a decade to achieve the same results," said Susan Danaher, President of the Digial Place-based Advertising Association (DPAA) at the 2010 annual Digital Media Summit (Press Release, 2010).

Interactive storefront advertising, particularly gesture-based, is one of the fastest growing types of emerging media, and hundreds of companies are investing millions in this new, entertaining technology. Interactive advertising places the consumer at the center of marketing communication because its effectiveness relies not only on how the marketer’s message influences the consumer, but also how the consumer shapes their interaction (Stafford 14 2005).

Interactive technologies combine 3D video, gesture recognition, augmented reality, holograms, audio, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, SMS and touch screens to create a realistic entertaining experience for pedestrians. It works by combining a visual user interface with a storefront display. The display provides several options to the user. A processor is connected to the display, which chronologically highlights each of these selection options for a period of time. The processor, during the highlighting period, receives one or more images of the user’s movement from an image input device. At this point, the processor determines whether the user’s gesture is contained in the one or more of the selection options. When a gesture is contained in the one of the option images, the processor performs an action determined by the highlighted selection option (Screen Solutions 2010).

Similar to the technology featured in the futuristic film Minority Report, this jaw-dropping advertising experience is truly unlike any other. Storefront gesture-based interactive advertising has a wide range of purposes, but whether the brand focuses on games, sports, art or showcasing their product line, the main goal is to connect with consumers through an interactive experience. Studies have found that interactive advertisements offer gratifications including convenience, diversion, relationship development and intellectual appeal (Stafford 14, 2005). In recent years there has been a strong transformation from brand/consumer transactions to interactions. Currently the goal is communication, rather than persuasion. Brands are compelled to develop personalities in order to form meaningful relationships with their customers. Gesture based store front advertising provides an outlet for brands to make that desired connection.

Consumers are attracted to interactive ads because they have complete control over their communication experiences (Stafford 14, 2005). Consumers initiate, sustain and end communication as they choose. Research has shown positive correlations between the intent to interact with an advertisement, attitudes toward the advertisement, attitudes toward the brand and intent to purchase (Stafford 115, 2005). This new wave of technology is capturing the attention of companies throughout the United States and the world, who desperately want to utilize the interactive experience to make their company stand out. Interactive storefront advertising is literally changing the way consumers interact with brands. Advertising has become a fun experience that consumers want to participate in, instead of an inevitable nuisance.




Interactive Technology Defined



Companies such as Monster Media, GestureTek and Inwindow Outdoor are the leading producers of interactive storefront advertising technologies. The different types of interactive storefront advertising are explained below.

Motion Reactive
Gesture-based technology combined with interactive video enables people to interact with what they see. Large displays respond to motion, creating surprising effects. The creative possibilities are endless and are at the control of the pedestrian (Screen Solutions 2010). A good example of this amazing technology is the storefront advergame based on Disney's Sorcerer's Apprentice.




Augmented Reality
Pedestrians see their reflection with a virtual image superimposed on their actual image. This type of advertising blurs the lines of reality, and allows the pedestrian to become part of the ad (Screen Solutions 2010). With new technologies, almost any graphic can be merged with the pedestrian's image and a live video stream in real time. An example of this is the interactive augmented reality window display for the movie Coraline.





Touch Screens
Unlike the motion reactive systems, touch screens allow people to specifically manipulate information in the same way they would a Web site. They can play games, change photos, watch videos or type to get more information on products (Screen Solutions 2010). Touch screen technology is utilized in the interactive MasterCard storefront advertisement.





Holograms
Using a sophisticated projection system and complete theatrical staging, any person or object is unbelievably realistic with innovative hologram technologies. Holograms, especially those in motion, look lifelike (Screen Solutions 2010). A good example is this storefront fashion advertisement in the Netherlands where a hologram of a young woman is trying on clothes.






3-D
When placed in a window, specialized content and customized lenticular overlays, combined with laser projection and large LCD screens gives the impression that objects are literally flying out into the street (Screen Solutions 2010). No 3-D glasses are necessary. A good example of this is the NFL's Monday night football advergame.





Audio
Specialized audio systems turn ordinary windows into speakers clearly heard by people within close range (Screen Solutions 2010). London's storefront gesture-based advertisement featuring the music store, Orange, uses audio technology.




Bluetooth/SMS/Wi-Fi
Usually when people walk away from an ad, they tend to forget about it. With the use of Bluetooth technologies, they can take a reminder with them on their cell phones. The format can be images, sound or video and is delivered quickly to almost any mobile phone within close range of the ad (Screen Solutions 2010). A good example of this is the Carnival aquarium storefront ad that incorporates cell phone use into the advertisement.




Sunscreens
Using an ordinary LCD or plasma screen in a window display won't look good. They are not bright enough in the daylight, and the result is a washed out effect. Sunscreens are custom made to be the brightest, highest contrast flat panel screens available for outdoor use. They're also full 1080p HD, so the image is incredibly detailed (Screen Solutions 2010). A good example is the bright lights featured in Harrahs Resorts' storefront ad.



Advantages



Reasons for designing an interactive ad include:
1) Reinforcing the brand’s image
2) Providing easy access to product information
3) Demonstrating technological sophistication
4) Improving customer service and providing a “community of consumers” atmosphere
(Bergh 452, 1999)
Businesses can profit from this type of advertising in many ways. Interactive storefront ads provide a twenty four-hour sales assistance that attracts and holds the viewer’s attention at the company’s location, which increases the opportunity for sales. There is also the option to create a shop window display where customers can access the entire product line. In addition, this type of technology allows instant change of content to react to local events and competition, which can be the difference between market leaders and those who fall behind. Lastly, the technology can be used to advertise complementary services of business partners, which will be cost effective (Screen Solutions 2010).
Other advantages include:
Sight, Sound, Motion & Stopping Power
The most powerful mediums combine creative visual stimulants, movement and sound (Warner 489, 2009). Well-executed gesture based storefront advertisements can grasp and hold a person’s attention unlike any other medium. Interactive advertising has the power to literally stop consumers in their tracks to participate in an entertaining activity. This gesture-based advertisement with stopping power is for Elle MacPherson intimates. A black screen slowly reveals a woman in her undergarments as people walk by.







ADIA Progression
The new, rare, technologically advanced advertisement attracts interest immediately. Pedestrians passing by someone participating in the experience are interested as well. Crowds form on the streets because of this interest, which attracts more people who are intrigued to see why everyone is so fascinated. Everyone want to try this new technology, which is why this type of advertising moves consumers through the AIDA model very quickly (Stafford 272, 2005).




aida.gif

Memorability and Telling Power
Gesture based store front advertising is so unique it is unforgettable. As an emerging media based on new technologies, people have not experienced anything like it. Since consumers know this experience is rare, they are more likely to tell their friends by posting pictures and comments on social media Web sites (Warner 489, 2009). In addition, some brands choose to incorporate social media Web sites such as, Twitter or cell phones into the advertisement, which also increase telling power. For example, the outdoor advertisement that transformed people into Navi in order to promote Avatar the movie, was a huge success. Not only were people talking about it, but also the advertisement had an option to post each avatar photo on Facebook, which increased popularity.







Entertainment
Gesture-based storefront advertisements usually incorporate games or quizzes to make the interaction enjoyable (Warner 489, 2009). Not only are people interested in the advertisement, they are genuinely having fun. Amusement leads to increased telling power as well (Stafford 272, 2005). PNC bank's Punch the Pig gesture-based storefront advergame is a fun experience for people of all ages.





Development of Brand Character
Whether or not the consumer purchases the product, they are connecting with the brand, which is important (Warner 489, 2009). In recent years, brands have been developing personalities, in order to form meaningful relationships with their consumers (Stafford 14, 2005). Interactive store front advertising provides a channel for brands to make that connection (Stafford 272, 2005). For example, Scion does not expect consumers to walk into their showroom and buy a car because of this ad. The ad's purpose is to build a relationship with the audience through interactivity.






Less Intrusive
Gesture-based technologies do not make the viewer feel attacked by advertisements, like other types of interactive media, such as Web-based pop-up ads (Stafford 13, 2005). Consumers are invited to try it if they choose to, but do not feel overwhelmed to do so. For example, the changes in this Nesquik commercial are subtle but noticeable. The movements entice pedestrians and invite them take a closer look.






Low Cost for Exposure Duration
After paying the initial fee for the gesture based system, there are no fees for the exposure duration if the ad is located in the storefront of the company's retailer (Warner 489, 2009). For example, this interactive storefront advertisement is located at the Chanel boutique in Paris, so it would have no cost for exposure duration.




Geographic Targeting
Unlike any other medium, outdoor interactive advertising can be purchased in a specific location and can alter the ad to specifically target the people in that region (Warner 489, 2009).

Face Recognition Technologies
Interactivity offers advertisers the potential for truly individualized communications via mass medium (Warner 351, 2004). With newly developed face and age recognition technologies, advertisements are now being specifically tailored to who is watching them. Face recognition, is the technology to scan a person’s face and tell immediately if they are male or female and their age range (Adweek 2008). Face recognition technologies are already being used in some out-of-home advertisements, and are becoming more popular by the day. Gesture based outdoor advertisements use face recognition to change the ad depending on the age range, race and sex of the person viewing them. Face recognition technologies are the future of advertising because specifically targeted ads generate more interest.
"If we take a look at all of the forms of media that are available today to engage consumers, it's vastly different and much more personal than at any other time in history,” said Mike Di Franza, President of Captivate Network, and DPAA Chairman (Press Release, 2010).





Frequency/Reach
Outdoor ads have one of the lowest cost per million (CPM) of any medium (Warner 489, 2009). People usually walk the same route to and from work each day, which increases frequency. Also, with this type of technologically advanced entertaining advertisement people want to talk about it, which increases reach, because even people who did not walk by it, heard about it and want to experience it.


Limitations




High start-up costs
The initial costs for the interactive gesture-based system are fairly high, which is why only large corporations can currently afford this type of advertising. But costs have been continuously decreasing as the ads increase in popularity (Vance 2010).

Transporatation
People commuting via automobile, subway or train will not be exposed to this type of advertising. Which is why urban settings are the prime placement for this type of advertising. In a rural setting, people drive almost everywhere.

Technical Difficulties
Advertising in this fashion requires a technological savvy team to fix the gesture based system if it breaks. Unlike other types of advertising, gesture based store front advertising depends solely on the success of new temperamental technologies.

Rural Areas
There is not enough foot traffic in small towns to make this type of advertising worthwhile. People in small towns usually drive most places. Most people living in rural areas do not walk by store windows unless they intend on purchasing something in that location. Also most towns will have the same people walking by the advertisement each day, unless they have constant tourism like New York City.

Time Sensitivity
The creator of the interactive ad has to be sensitive to the time it takes to retrieve information. It is important to understand that graphics load slower than text. Pedestrians walking by are usually on their way somewhere, and they will quickly move on if the information is taking too long to download (Bergh, 591, 1999).

“Today's youth are technology savvy, content snackers with a much shorter attention span than people that came before them,” said Mike Di Franza, President of Captivate Network, and DPAA Chairman.

Costs



Outdoor ads have one of the lowest cost per million (CPM) of any medium (Warner 489, 2009). Currently gesture-based outdoor advertising is only in large cities such as New York City and San Francisco where the advertisements have such a high reach and frequency, they pay for themselves. After paying the initial fee for the gesture based system, there are no fees for the exposure duration because it is usually in the advertised company’s location.

“The 3-D cameras used to cost $5,000,” said Michel Tombroff, the chief executive of Softkinetic, which makes software for the 3-D gesture recognition systems. “That price has come down to $50 or less for the bill of materials,” (Vance 2010).
“Brands with big budgets are testing the waters with interactive video to get some buzz, but it’s definitely not limited to the luxury category,” said Steve Birnhak, CEO of Inwindow Outdoor. “When the costs come down, smaller brands may jump on board,”(Mallaghan 2008).
In spring 2010, the Digital Place-based Advertising Association conducted research among strategic media planners to gain a greater understanding of the role of digital placed-based advertising. Research shows that digital placed-based media was being funded from a wide range of sources. Fewer than 50% of planners were allotting funds from their outdoor budgets. Television and digital accounted for approximately 30% of funding, and 25% of planners indicated that digital placed-based media was funded through a zero-based approach, where total income minus total expenses equals $0 (Press Release, 2010).
According to a newly released study from Mediamark Research & Intelligence (MRI), “digital placed-based media is helping advertisers to enhance their communications strategies by delivering a comparable audience to television.” Arbitron also recently reported, “more than 120 million adults have viewed place-based digital video each week, placing digital out-of-home media as the 4th most effective mass medium behind television, radio, and the Internet.” Digital out-of-home networks are also gaining influence among affluent consumers. According to research from Ipsos Mendelsohn, “69% of affluent consumers, defined as households with incomes of $100,000 or more, expressed considerable interest in the advertising they viewed on place-based networks," (Press Release, 2010).



Reach and Frequency




The reach and frequency of interactive store front ads is very high compared to other media vehicles. Gesture-based storefront ads tend to focus more on reach though because of the sheer excitement and desire to participate surrounding the ads. Also the fact they they are only located in large cities, shows that reach is a key factor in the ads success. People usually walk the same route to and from work each day, which increases frequency. In addition, since the ad is technologically advanced and entertaining, people tend to talk about it via word-of mouth or social media. Brand advocates that discuss the ad increase reach, because people who did not see it hear about it and desire to experience it. Also, the fact that the ad is still rare intrigues people unlike traditional media (Mallaghan 2008).

Impact

“They're called Millennials, and many of them read "tweets" the same way previous generations read novels. As a result, advertisers are rethinking how they deliver messages and engage with these new consumers. Video everywhere is the new brand strategy that will span multiple platforms, which include mobile devices, laptops, television, and place-based digital out-of-home networks. This is the world of the future, and it's the world that we need to prepare for and build our infrastructure," said Mike Di Franza, President of Captivate Network, and DPAA Chairman (Press Release 2010).
Nikk Smith, technical director at Pixel Inspiration, agrees that the use of digital technology, and in particular gesture-based interactivity, for storefronts will only increase. “My best guess is that stores will use the interactive technology as a way to enable customers to browse product information, potentially checking on availability and providing a conduit into other purchasing channels, connecting with online, call centre and mobile services,” said Smith. “Certainly, the ‘impact’ campaigns will continue for some time while the technology remains novel.”

"At some point I can see entire storefronts being digital wallpaper that is infinitely customizable by the brand and manipulable by the people walking by," said Steve Birnhak, CEO of the leading outdoor-advertising company Inwindow Outdoor. "The impact will only be limited by the creativity of the people making the content,”(Mallaghan 2008).
Audience Qualities


More than 120 million people have seen advertising on place-based digital out-of-home networks (Press Release 2010). People of all ages find this advertising method enjoyable. The target demographic for interactive advertisements are educated people ages 18 – 60. Younger people are amused and excited by the interactive attributes. Families with children are also likely to participate in interactive outdoor advertising because of the fun nature of the ads. Older people are in awe that technology has become so advanced. Although the ads are meant to be enjoyed by everyone, due to the complex technological nature of the ads, some older people do not understanding the ads or take advantage of their full potential (AdAge 2008). Research has shown that interactivity has an overall positive correlation with on consumers’ attitudes and behaviors with a brand.

According to a newly released study from Mediamark Research & Intelligence (MRI), “digital placed-based media is helping advertisers to enhance their communications strategies by delivering a comparable audience to television.” Arbitron also recently reported, “more than 120 million adults have viewed place-based digital video each week, placing digital out-of-home media as the 4th most effective mass medium behind television, radio, and the Internet.” Digital out-of-home networks are also gaining influence among affluent consumers. According to research from Ipsos Mendelsohn, “69% of affluent consumers, defined as households with incomes of $100,000 or more, expressed considerable interest in the advertising they viewed on place-based networks, (Press Release 2010)”


Scheduling Strategies



Continuous advertising is most sensible with this type of medium. After paying the initial fee for the gesture based system, there are no fees for the exposure duration, as long as it is located in the advertising company’s window (Warner 489, 2009). In addition, providing continuous support for pedestrians through an interactive window display, gives customers the satisfaction of twenty-four hour assistance. Continuous support leads to brand trust and loyalty among consumers. Also, the continuous advertising window display could be used to advertise for other companies in the hours the company is closed, which would generate profits and the system would ultimately pay for itself.
Responses of Audiences



Audiences are excited and shocked by the futuristic quality of these advertisements. Consumers are curious, since this technology is so highly advanced and rare. They are also more likely to tell people about their one-of-a-kind brand experience via mobile phone, Facebook, Twitter or YouTube. A study recently commissioned by POPAI and 3M designed to test 3M’s Vikuiti rear-projection film sheds some light on how customers react to digital window displays. Around 88 percent of people interviewed thought that the screens enhanced the store image, 2.5 percent of people entered the store because of the display content, 42 percent could recall the brand advertised, and up to 1.8 percent watched the entire video presentation (Mallaghan 2008).

Interactive storefront advertising quickly moves the consumer through the AIDA process (Zimmerman 45, 2003). Their attention is grasped immediately by the larger than life digital window displays that change as they walk by. Then they quickly develop interest and desire to participate, because the experience is so unusual and technologically advanced. Action is achieved quicker than any other type of advertising because of such high levels of curiosity, interest and desire(Mallaghan 2008). Crowds are literally standing in line for a chance to participate in this type of amusing advertisement. The rare, innovative, technological nature of the ad, as well as the fact that consumers value the feeling of being in control, causes pedestrians to take action knowing they can walk away at any time (Stafford 115, 2005).


Successes


Hundreds of brands are using gesture-based storefront technology in their advertising. Some examples are listed below (InwindowOutdoor.com/Monstermedia.net/Gesturetek.com).

  • Tommy Hilfiger
  • Ford
  • Adobe
  • Apple
  • Target
  • Walmart
  • Nike
  • Phillips
  • MTV
  • VH1
  • Nesquik
  • Carnival
  • Charles Schwab
  • Chanel
  • Harrah’s Resort
  • Kleenex
  • Gillette
  • BMW
  • Toyota
  • Lexus
  • Nissan
  • Java
  • Pepsi
  • Coke
  • Maker’s Mark
  • Absolut
  • Miller
  • AquaFresh
  • Adidas
  • Phillip Morris
  • DIRECTV
  • A&E
  • Orbitz
  • Dollar
  • iShares
  • Sprint
  • Timberland
  • Footlocker
  • NFL
  • NHL
  • Nintendo
  • Siemans
  • Google
  • American Express
  • McDonalds
  • Transitions
  • Cricket
  • Droid
  • Blackberry
  • Intel
  • Jim Beam
  • Cottonelle
  • Coors
  • Amway
  • XBOX 360
  • Black Eyed Peas
  • Youtube
  • IBM
  • XROX
  • Mitsubishi
  • Calvin Klein
  • Burger King
  • Intel
  • Red Bull
  • M&M
  • Budweiser
  • ESPN
  • CBS
  • ABC
  • Chevrolet
  • Delta
  • Evian
  • Gatorade
  • Fuze
  • Golden Peak
  • Jeep
  • Kraft
  • Kenneth Cole
  • LG
  • Land Rover
  • Motorola
  • NAVY
  • Western Union
  • Nestea
  • NBC
  • Levis
  • Microsoft
  • Nautica
  • P&G
  • Puma
  • Starbucks
  • Skittles
  • Tide
  • TLC
  • CW
  • Travel Channel
  • Verizon
Movies
  • The Quantum of Solace
  • Disney's the Sorcerer's Apprentice
  • Toy Story 3-D
  • Avatar
  • Coraline


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